Men’s Studies?

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  • #6332

    Anonymous
    Member

    I call myself a women’s studies researcher, and even though I was once proud to be called a feminist, today I see them as separate fields.

    Men’s studies and masculism are seen as synonymous, so women’s studies should be synonymous with feminism.

    Women-haters are called masculinists. So shouldn’t men-haters be called femininists?

    By this definition, Caroline Criado-Perez, Stella Creasy MP, Jess Phillips MP would be femininists, not feminists as they claim.

    What can Men’s studies do to prevent young men becoming masculinists because of femininists speaking for women when all they speak for is bigotry?

    #6333

    I hear you want change. So do I.
    I am not familiar with the names of these persons.

    I want to question the word because in your last sentence,
    I do not believe that it is this simple.

    Men doesn’t become masculinists because of feminists, it’s a free choice.
    Men have to have better choices than they do at this point.

    Hate and blame is an easy position,
    giving the person a sense of safety.

    MLK said something like: The riot is the voice of the poor.

    I do believe that genderhate is a voice of the powerless,
    blaming the opposite sex to gain (some) power.

    Right now we need love and understanding more than pointing fingers.

    Young men need the presence and attention of older men
    to grow into themselves.

    #6342

    Anonymous
    Member

    Feminists (sic) are leading young men to become masculinists, as this programme found:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b06s5h18/reggie-yates-extreme-uk-2-men-at-war

    It is quite easy to see how young men, being denied opportunities and others rights, and being expected to fulfil stereotypes they do not have the capacity to, causes them to become how they are.

    One only has choice if one has opportunity and to be able to choose between those opportunities. In the 2010s men are as disadvantaged as women were in the 1930s. In the 1930s if women wanted a family and good life they had to do whatever men said. As a result of benevolent sexism in the courts, police and child support system against men just because they are men, we have gone full-circle. Here is the research that proves that:

    The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers

    The courts, police and child support systems should be making decisions based on the merits of one party or another, but not assume that just because someone is of a certain sex that their sexist prejudices should be allowed to come through in their decisions. Power + Prejudice = Discrimination.

    #6351

    Great articulation and a great article you have written, because I suppose you are the article writer?

    “It is quite easy to see how young men, being denied opportunities and others rights, and being expected to fulfill stereotypes they do not have the capacity to, causes them to become how they are.”

    I agree with this finding, and I might need the writers, (your?) input how to keep Mensmovement.com free from trolling as we invite everyone in the community.

    What I do believe is that the expression of men’s frustration from this double bind of resources and expectations will differ. We are all free to live up, or not to live up, to others expectations. Free choice. It is understandable to turn to both bitterness, blame, and hate. Although all these things is a choice.

    I also want to stress that the Masculinist/feminist dicotomy is false. There is so many positions one could take on the gender spectrum. Personally I agree with arguments from all sides.

    Thank you for the great input.

    Kindly David

    #7337

    Beckett
    Participant

    <span style=”color: #000000; font-family: ‘Open Sans’, ‘Helvetica Neue’, sans-serif; line-height: 22.8571px;”>Hi Anonymous.</span>

    <span style=”color: #000000; font-family: ‘Open Sans’, ‘Helvetica Neue’, sans-serif; line-height: 22.8571px;”>You say “The courts, police and child support systems should be making decisions based on the merits of one party or another, but not assume that just because someone is of a certain sex that their sexist prejudices should be allowed to come through in their decisions.”</span>

    This is very true, and most feminists would totally agree with you. Certainly myself and those I respect and learn from would. Women are seen as automatically being better parents as a result of patriarchal views that frame women as home-makers and child raisers, and men as breadwinners. This is probably what leads to women getting custody more often, or men being advised not to fight for it.

    A great example of a patriarchal idea harming men. We really need to challenge how society shoehorns the sexes into certain roles, regardless of individuality.

    #7356

    Miss Sue Walker
    Participant

    Hi all, I’m currently researching men’s experiences of improving access to psychological therapies (primary care talking therapies for common mental health problems such as anxiety and depression). So far I’m finding that this type of service delivery is not what men (majority of) want. This has led to me finding out more about alternatives such as Men’s Sheds and other initiatives aimed at men’s wellbeing that do not fit a typical NHS service delivery model but are hard to quantify in a way that would count as proof that they work. If anyone has any useful references or experiences they can share I would be very appreciative. The above information has already been very helpful. Thanks in advance! Sue

    #7358

    Hi, Miss Sue Walker.

    Interesting research you are doing. There should be many resources about this topic. And this community is a great place to start. Which University and which department? Psychology or Gender Studies, or something else?

    Yes, I have heard that men do not respond as well to traditional talking therapy as women do.

    There is some psychologist in Canada or the US that walks with all his clients during sessions.

    There is MKP, ManKind Project and all their great work with men, men’s weekends and initiations.

    There are some of our Twitter followers that run men’s sheds in New Zeeland, South Africa, and Australia. Perhaps they could know?

    You would be interested in talking to Dr. Kristine Abercrombie at Lets Talk Psychology Services, in Nothern Ireland. She is very into online therapy and other ways to bring psychological services to men. And she is experienced working with men. If you get a hold of her, say hello from David Pilbäck.

    One of the biggest problems with holistic approaches to mental health is that there is low global interest in funding the research on holistic solutions.

    It’s much like the research of kindergarten and kids mental health, dissociation, shutting down and other mental disorders. We had research done during the 70-ties which found that the symptoms went down when we went from 5 kids per adult to 3 children per adult. No one of the responsible politicians wants to know what is going on because the society as a whole benefit from stuffing the kids away in the short term.

     

     

    #7359

    Hi, Miss Sue Walker.

    Interesting research you are doing. There should be many resources about this topic. And this community is a great place to start. Which University and which department? Psychology or Gender Studies, or something else?

    Yes, I have heard that men do not respond as well to traditional talking therapy as women do.

    There is some psychologist in Canada or the US that walks with all his clients during sessions.

    There is MKP, ManKind Project and all their great work with men, men’s weekends and initiations.

    There are some of our Twitter followers that run men’s sheds in New Zeeland, South Africa, and Australia. Perhaps they could know?

    You would be interested in talking to Dr. Kristine Abercrombie at Lets Talk Psychology Services, in Nothern Ireland. She is very into online therapy and other ways to bring psychological services to men. And she is experienced working with men. If you get a hold of her, say hello from David Pilbäck.

    One of the biggest problems with holistic approaches to mental health is that there is low global interest in funding the research on holistic solutions.

    It’s much like the research of kindergarten and kids mental health, dissociation, shutting down and other mental disorders. We had research done during the 70-ties which found that the symptoms went down when we went from 5 kids per adult to 3 children per adult. No one of the responsible politicians wants to know what is going on because the society as a whole benefit from stuffing the kids away in the short term.

     

     

    #9777

    ManCoach
    Participant

    Hi Miss Sue Walker,

    Sorry that I’m just replying now, but I’ve only just come across this forum. The work you are doing sounds really interesting and I suppose you have moved on a bit now – perhaps even completed your work?

    I do a lot of work with men as a coach! I have a couple of thoughts around the topic of conversation here. As a coach, my primary aim is to work with men that are resourceful enough to understand that they would like to change certain aspects of their lives – they have the fortitude to do so and are motivated to achieve these outcomes. Now, not every client displays these traits.

    I can’t really comment on the NHS model as I don’t know an awful lot about it – suffice to say that when present themselves to the GP around anxiety, depression or anything else that requires a talking therapy – it is often not early enough (male stereotyping – man up, be strong, don’t show emotions etc). These men are not resourceful enough to work through their condition – they just want a solution, to be fixed!

    Engaging with a therapist, coach or any other form of holistic person requires energy from the client. Perhaps the guy can’t even get out of bed such is the debilitation of his depression?

    I watched my wife create strong peer networks as our young children went to play groups – women she still goes out with to this day (18 years later). Men usually do not have the opportunity to create such networks and as such do not know where to turn to when things get tough for them. Women are definitely more inclined to use their networks to talk around issue that may be affecting them.

    I hope that helps you in some way? Sorry it’s 8 months later than you posted!!

    Chris

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